Luke Davey’s unsuccessful Judicial Review case against Oxfordshire – analysed from a legal perspective

Luke Davey has lost his judicial review against Oxfordshire’s revised care plan in light of the cessation of the ILF.

Luke Davey – High Court judgment in full

What issues did this case raise?

– The problem of dealing with clients who had been able to supplement the council’s care packages with ILF money, once that source of additional funding for people dried up: ILF was effectively a grant that enabled a large number of younger people to meet a large slice of their own needs, thereby purchasing a better quality of life and more well-being than those who were not eligible for the grant could ever have hoped for by way of social care. Inevitably when the fund closed, a loss of wellbeing was going to be experienced whenever a council decided that it could not and would not continue to pay for everything that the individual had previously had the means to buy.

– Whether a council must be able to show in detail whether it considered all of the statutory wellbeing features set out both in section 1(2) and had regard to those in 1(3) of the Care Act (to which the answer was yes, and the essence of s.1(3)(d) is a duty, when taking decisions, “have regard to each person’s particular individual circumstances.”

– Who is the decision-maker on what a person needs, after they have been found at least eligible? (the council), and to what extent are the client’s personally desired outcomes a necessary or determining factor for care planning? “There is no warrant for a conclusion that [the] balance is weighted more in favour of the service user, than it would otherwise be under the Act, to the extent that the service user can have the final say on his own needs and personal budget or dislodge the principle that, under the Act, the decisions are ultimately to be taken by the local authority. The wishes of the disabled person may be a primary influence, but they do not amount to an overriding consideration.”

– The extent to which a reduction in social activities on account of a reduced budget would invalidate a care plan’s legal validity: “It is possible that there might be less opportunity to go on day trips accompanied by his PAs. This very limited curtailment does not amount to a breach of s.1 of the Act.”

– How far a council has to go, in taking all reasonable steps to agree a care plan with the client before saying “No, we are not paying any more, and this is why.” – to which the answer was quite far, and conscientiously, but consent is not a necessary constituent of a signed off care plan.

– How minutely or not a council needs to be able to justify its mathematics in relation to its stance that what it is offering will conceivably and defensibly meet need: not down to the penny, and the evidence basis might in certain cases need only to be based on the staff’s opinion based on experience. With regard to carers’ terms and conditions, the higher DP agency rate was irrelevant because the client preferred to employ carers. And the Defendant said that there was no evidence that carers would leave, as the two main carers had withdrawn their resignations and the minimum wage of £7.20 “and the £40 night shift rate were compatible with rates many other service users were paying.”

– The extent to which a person’s emotional and psychological health and wellbeing are factors which are so obviously material to a proper assessment or care plan that a failure to take them into account would constitute grounds to vitiate any relevant decision: the judge found in favour of the Claimant’s position on this issue.

– The meaning of the concept of ‘independent living’, as a right in article 19 of the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities. It is not going to be of any real use to a disabled person, where the domestic legal framework presents as more detailed in relation to domains of daily life and wellbeing: in particular, no specific ambiguity in the Care Act was identified, in respect of which Article 19 might serve as an interpretive tool.

– The extent to which a council can say to a direct payment claimant “even if this sum isn’t enough for what we accept is an appropriate way for you to meet, it’s enough for something else that would do” (with regard to the notional cost of live in care). The council did not succeed in contending that the cost of something that they had not ever seriously suggested that Mr Davey could be offered (live in care in his own home) should be a benchmark proving that the greater cost offered was automatically enough – and that is not surprising: no council cannot offer a budget for something that would depend on a contract between a third party and the client about the use of a room belonging to the client!) The judge said this: “The purpose of the Personal Budget in the October 2015 Support Plan is a budget to cover the cost of a team of PAs. In this regard, whether alternative live-in care could be paid for within this budget is not relevant.”


Is it an end to litigation and the promise of the Care Act?

It’s the first proper case on care planning and wellbeing under the Care Act in a period of extreme austerity in adult social care, so it is very helpful for everyone; and there are no surprises in the judgement for anyone who appreciated that the Law Commission’s vision for the Care Act was based on continuing the substance of the pre-Act case law built up over 15 years.

But it is not an indication that a 42% cut in what has been spent overall, (eg in a mixed package with Health, and supplemented by ILF) is always going to be a safe bet for a council. There was a cut in what had been spent, but it was not a cut in what the local authority had contributed: it was an increase – and one in respect of which the judge said this: “The Defendant did put in a very substantial amount of effort, over an extended period of time, to seek to assuage the concerns of the Claimant and his mother.” There is no explanation as to what happened to the NHS contribution, interestingly enough, when the ILF ceased.

The legality of a cut to a care plan all depends on adherence to due process as well as to rational defensible substantive thinking on the matters that the Care Act and guidance require to be considered.

For legal framework commentators who like to assert that ‘need’ can be a subjective concept for the client’s determination under the Care Act, this part of the judgment would finally appear to make such a stance untenable: “there is no duty to achieve the outcomes which the adult wishes to achieve; rather it is a duty to assess whether the provision of care and support could contribute to those outcomes. On the other hand if, in the course of a needs assessment, the local authority does not assess the matters specified in s.9(4) (including the impact on wellbeing matters set out in s.1(2)) then there is a breach of the statutory duty. There is, thus, a duty on the part of the local authority to assess these factors.”

The implications for practitioners:

Legal practitioners need to refresh their memories of the public law that they learned once: procedural impropriety, illegality, irrationality and breach of human rights are the grounds for judicial review; and to remember that judicial review is not an appeal – a high threshold of irrationality has to be reached to shift the position that a public body’s decision, particularly as to the use of scarce resources, is valid – it remains that way until quashed, even if people don’t agree with it. “The result may impose change or even strictures upon the Claimant which are unwelcome, but that does not of themselves mean that the process has been unlawful.”

When reading assessments it is important to focus on whether the issues facing the client are reported speech by him/her, or a carer – or a professional’s opinion, whether or not consistent with what they the staff, have been told.

Social workers and advocates need more legal literacy elements in their professional training – difficult conversations training, effectively, by people with legal acumen.

The funding (and thus the PA hours) had been sensibly tapered down over a period. An experienced social worker was brave enough to assert in this case that being alone for longer periods of each day would improve Mr Davey’s independence and confidence, and that changes in the Claimant’s current care team would be positive for the Claimant and his emotional wellbeing, enabling him to reduce dependence upon specific carers. This reminds me that the position of Kensington & Chelsea was that not providing mobility assistance at night would improve Ms McDonald’s privacy and safety. “That was a social worker’s assessment which could not be regarded as Wednesbury unreasonable and was a matter for her professional judgment…. I am satisfied that Ms Lovelock and Ms Collins did genuinely believe both that developing the Claimant’s independence was a need and that spending more time alone was a way in which to achieve this end.”

One may not aspire to be the person who has to say such things, as a social work trainee, but one needs to bite the bullet, if it can be done conscientiously and consistently with social work professional ethics, if one chooses to work in the public sector. A position on the part of a client, carer and advocate that it is essential that there are no changes to a plan, although understandable in human terms, cannot be allowed to fetter the judgement and probing for an evidence base by review staff who are spending public money.

Any council or CCG can offer a re-assessment, once challenged about a proposed revision – and many do, once someone is well informed enough to point out that the public body has blatantly failed to comply with the Act somewhere along the customer journey. Judicial review could achieve no more, after all. But the re-assessment won’t be of any use to the client if the council’s instructions to staff about re-assessment amount to a continuing illegality under the Act: for example – “Make sure that the indicative budget comes out at what it came out at before, even if you have written down more of the client’s outcomes”; or “Do not let the carer even begin to think of withdrawing from caring informally – we can’t afford that”.

Given the risk above, practitioners MUST elicit sufficient information from a council or CCG as to their approach to the statutory thinking stages, prior to being able to give the client an idea whether or not there are grounds for judicial review – and accept or refuse a re-assessment as part of pre-action protocol correspondence, dependent on whether the public body is prepared to shift any indefensible approach that would still infect any new process.

On the question of pay rates for PAs in the area, where the evidence from the council was weak and based on the practitioner’s opinion, contracts teams can help with evidence; with regard to any cuts, and public bodies’ lawyers should note that it is always best to add to a care plan words such as this: “if problems do arise from the trialled changes, we will revisit the issue.”

This openness to the need to reconsider the situation soon, helped Oxfordshire on pay rates but it was also clear that Mr Davey had in the past and recently himself recruited external non-family carers at the minimum wage. The council provided a cogent explanation why the Claimant’s evidence of a lack of response to his own recent advert for carers, did not establish that it was difficult to recruit at the rate provided for.

It’s not surprising that Mr Davey lost, on the facts of the case. His carers withdrew their resignations and he very honestly acknowledged that as long as he didn’t have to have more than 2 hours alone, he could stand more than one period a day of being alone, without suffering from depression or anxiety, and he had refused counselling.

But I don’t think that the case sends any particular message out that this is a field that will be shutting down.

It was just not the best case to take to court on wellbeing if one wanted to set a precedent that would be good for disabled people – in the same way that Elaine McDonald’s and KM’s cases were not the best cases to take about the concept of dignity in care, or about justification for the sum allocated.

What are the practical implications of this case?

For Oxfordshire, satisfaction that their conscientiousness and experience of senior staff won the day within the judicial review jurisdiction and relief that they were allowed to get their case in order during the run up to the hearing…

For the gentleman’s PAs, a choice as to whether to take less money by way of salary or leave…

For the rest of us – whoever we may be advising – the need to balance the desire to stand up for someone, against keeping in full sight the risk that there need to be some rock solid un-loseable cases brought to court under the Care Act – if things are really so very grim out there – which is why I am promoting the launch of a charity for free legal advice to try to encourage those cases out of the woodwork.

CASCAIDr will launch soon, once it has been approved for registration by the Charity Commission.

Belinda Schwehr

About Belinda Schwehr

Belinda has been a lawyer (both a barrister and then a solicitor advocate), a law lecturer at a university, and a trainer and consultant specialising in Adults' Social Care legal framework issues. She first became interested in social care law when the Gloucestershire case was running between 1995 and 1997, never having met a real live social worker, before that point! She regards social care as the most interesting field of law she has ever been associated with, combining aspects of public law, the regulation of power, economics, management skills, EU law, procurement, criminal law, incapacity law, land law and contract, and doesn't expect ever to tire of the stuff. If the Care Act is going to be the last word on it, however, she would like to think it was worth all that sitting there and getting fatter whilst thinking about how it should all hang together! She does glass craftwork and house renovations for a hobby, has one son in his twenties, and about 5000 online friends... soon to be 50,000, with any luck!

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